Fraud Alerts http://fcnb.ca/fraud-alerts.html hourly 1 1970-01-01T00:00+00:00 FRAUD ALERT - Bank investigator scam uses common red flags of fraud http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38749447 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/1b5/042/3b2/Bank-Investigator-Scam.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="287" size="250" border="0" daid="17900612">Bank investigator scam uses common red flags of fraud</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">FCNB is warning New Brunswickers about a modern twist on an old scam known as the ‘bank investigator’ scam after being alerted that a Saint John resident recently lost money to this fraud. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Circulating since the 1950s, this telephone scam involves a scammer calling you pretending to be a representative of a financial institution working on a fraud case.</font>The scammer says they need your help to stop this fraud, and they want to use your bank account in the sting operation.</div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">In this particular case, the scammer called the victim in the early morning claiming a suspicious purchase of iTunes gift cards was made on the victim’s credit card. The scammer later said that the victim had been approved to participate in a sting operation to catch suspicious employees at local bank branches involved in the suspected scam. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">When the victim questioned the legitimacy of the sting operation, the scammer provided specific information about the individual’s bank account to make it sound legitimate. The victim was also advised not to contact the bank because it would “tip them off” to the investigation.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">The victim was instructed to go to a particular store to buy $1,400 of iTunes cards.  The scammer implied that the store may be involved in the scam as well. Once he purchased the iTunes cards, the victim was instructed to provide the scammer with the codes on the back of the iTunes cards so they could be tracked.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">The victim was then given the name of a security personnel to call at the local bank branch at a specific time to learn the results of the sting investigation.  When the victim called the branch, he discovered the investigation was a hoax. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">How to Spot the Common Red Flags in the Bank Investigator Scam:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You receive a telephone call early in the morning, often when you are still sleeping, from someone claiming to be a representative from a financial institution (Red Flag: Catches you off guard).</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You are rushed into making a decision or giving personal information (Red Flag: Pressures you to act fast).</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You are asked to make a purchase of iTunes gift cards or other company gift cards, pre-paid credit cards or cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin (Red Flag: Pay with unusual methods). </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You are asked to keep the information the scammer is providing secret (Red Flag: Ask you to keep it a secret because you might be warned it’s a scam!).</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight"><b>How to protect yourself from this scam:</b></font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be alert when dealing with your financial matters. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never provide personal or banking information to someone you do not know on the phone, in a text or in an email. Call your bank with a number from your records, or the phone book to confirm if this is in fact legitimate. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Always question urgent requests for money.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do not forward or transfer money to people you do not know.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never make a payment to a financial institution using iTunes gift cards. A financial institution or legitimate organization will never ask you to pay using these gift cards.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Don’t transfer money or codes to anyone that you do not know.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do not assume the phone numbers appearing on call display are accurate</font>. Criminals use “Call Spoofing” technology to mislead victims.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Where to report the Bank Investigator Scam:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you have been a victim of this scam, contact your financial institution immediately, your local police or RCMP and the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre</a>. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Learn more about <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">how to report fraud</a> and <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">where to report fraud</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Sign up to receive <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/subscribe.html" class="plainlarge">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your email.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-11-27T07:30:45-08:00 FRAUD ALERT - Bank investigator scam uses common red flags of fraud Bargain hunting season could turn into a wild goose chase http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38745962 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17898847" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/277/358/34d/CAFC-Cancelled-Discounts.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">News Release from the <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/competition-bureau.html" class="plainlarge">Competition Bureau</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1">Bargain hunting season could turn into a wild goose chase</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The biggest online shopping events of the year are coming up. Nearly half of Canadians are expected to be joining the online hunt for bargains this Black Friday and Cyber Monday. If you’re one of them, before going wild take a minute to learn about an advertising trend that’s on the Competition Bureau’s radar: cancelled discounts.  </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">This is how it works: when shopping on a popular retailer’s website, you find a super deal on a video game, computer, fashion accessory, clothing or houseware. You place the item in your basket, check out and pay. You then receive an email purchase confirmation. Everything seems normal.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Later on, you receive an email from the retailer’s customer service. They say there was an error and they can’t honour the advertised price. They cancel your order. Surprisingly, when you go back to the website, the exact same product is still being offered but at a higher price.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Under certain circumstances, failing to provide the product at the advertised bargain price could be seen as an illegal <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/03798.html" class="plainlarge">bait and switch</a>. That’s why it’s important that you know what to look out for, what your rights are and where to complain.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be sure to:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Always keep email purchase confirmations and credit card statements.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>Get a complete refund</b> if the order can’t be fulfilled at the right price.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Confirm that the money is back into your account.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Keep any email exchanges with the retailer’s customer service, especially a confirmation that they’ll give a full refund.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Double-check the website if they claim the item is unavailable at the price offered. If the ad is still up, take a screen shot, ask questions and request that it be corrected so fellow bargain hunters don’t fall into the same trap.  </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Keep records and file a complaint with the <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/frm-eng/GH%C3%89T-7TDNA5" class="plainlarge">Competition Bureau</a> if the retailer claims the item is unavailable at the price you paid but it’s available at a higher price.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Know that depending on provincial or territorial consumer protection law, the retailer may have to honour the advertised price. Contact your <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.consumerhandbook.ca/en/contacts/provincial-territorial-offices" class="plainlarge">local consumer protection agency</a> to learn more. </font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Here are some extra precautions you can take when shopping online:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">U<font style="" class="plainlarge">se a credit card; many offer protection and may give you a refund.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Regularly check your credit card statements for frequent or unknown charges.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Don’t hesitate to contact the retailer’s customer service if you have questions, especially if your money is gone and there’s no product in sight. You might only have a small window of time to flag the problem and alert your credit card provider.</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you believe you have been misled, contact the Competition Bureau and file a complaint by phone at 1-800-348-5358 or <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/frm-eng/GH%C3%89T-7TDNA5" class="plainlarge">online</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>Related products</b></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/00522.html" class="plainlarge">Price-related representations</a></font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/03798.html" class="plainlarge">Bait and switch</a></font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/competition-bureau/news/2018/03/online-shopping-scams-handle-with-care.html" class="plainlarge">Online shopping scams: handle with care</a></font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/h_04118.html" class="plainlarge">Consumer and Business Alerts</a></font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Learn more about <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">how to report fraud</a> and <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">where to report fraud</a>.</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>Sign up to receive <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/subscribe.html" class="plainlarge">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your email.</font></div><div style="" class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div style="" class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-11-22T05:30:24-08:00 Bargain hunting season could turn into a wild goose chase FRAUD ALERT – Ambulance Emergency Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38704966 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/3d4/1d8/0a4/Ambulance-Emergency-Scam.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="163" size="250" border="0" daid="17885315">FRAUD ALERT – Ambulance Emergency Scam</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">A new twist on the emergency scam is targeting New Brunswickers.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">FCNB has received reports of a scam artist calling New Brunswickers pretending to be an employee of an ambulance service. In one case, they reported being from “Ambulance Saint John.” In another case, they pretended they were calling from an ambulance service in Maine.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">The scammer claims that a relative has been injured in an accident and money is needed to cover the relative’s medical bills. They say the money needs to be sent immediately so treatment can continue.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>How to recognize the Ambulance Emergency Scam: </b></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span style="" class="plain"><b><br></b></span></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">This scam is a variation of the Emergency Scam (sometimes referred to as the Grandparents Scam). This scam has been around for years and typically involves a grandparent receiving a call from a con-artist claiming to be one of his or her grandchildren. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">The caller goes on to say they are in some kind of trouble and need money immediately. Wanting to help their grandchild, the victim sends money by money transfer. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">In this latest scam, the scammer pretending to be from an ambulance service may ask questions to get you to reveal personal information. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>What to do if you receive a phone call:</b></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span style="" class="plain"><b><br></b></span></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Take time to verify the story. The scammer is counting on you to respond quickly to the emergency situation. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Hang up and call the person they claim has been injured, or a close family member of the person, to see if the story is true.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never send money to anyone you don’t know.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never give out any personal information to the caller.  </font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>Where to report the scam:</b></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span style="" class="plain"><b><br></b></span></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Report the ambulance emergency scam to your local police or RCMP, or the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre</a>, either online or by its toll free number: 1-888-495-8501.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Learn more about <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">how to report fraud</a> and <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">where to report fraud</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Sign up to receive <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/subscribe.html" class="plainlarge">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your email.</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-10-23T09:35:11-07:00 FRAUD ALERT – Ambulance Emergency Scam FRAUD ALERT: Email iTunes Gift Card Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38681000 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/302/306/34b/iTunes-gift-card-scam.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="287" size="250" border="0" daid="17877108">FRAUD ALERT: Email iTunes Gift Card Scam</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">A Fredericton woman was recently the target of an email scam that preys on the generosity of her friends and contacts.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Hackers took control of her email account and sent everyone in her contacts an email asking for a favour. The email went something like this:</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">“I need a favour from you. I need to get iTunes gift cards for my niece. It’s her birthday, but I’m currently traveling. Can you pick them up from a store around you? I’ll pay you back as soon as I am back.”</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Friends who responded to the email request were told to purchase $200 worth of iTunes gift cards, scratch the back of the cards to reveal the PIN numbers, take a photo of the PINS and send the photo back.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">This scam is also called confidence fraud. The scam artists pretend they are somebody you know and care about and play on your desire to help your friend. Once the scammers get the iTunes gift cards pictures, they cash in by selling the codes for a fraction of the retail price.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Some of the woman’s friends realized it was a scam and alerted her about the hack.  Because the hackers had rerouted replies to the fake email, she had no way of knowing what had happened.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">How to recognize this type of scam:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The email may be poorly written and contain grammatical mistakes.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You are asked to reveal the PIN codes, take a photo of them and send them in an email. </font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">What to do if you receive an email like this:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Ignore it and delete it.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Advise your friend their email has been hacked by calling them. Your friend may not have access to their hacked email account.</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">What to do if your email has been hacked:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Contact your email service provider to report the hack. They will help you through the steps to take back your email account from the hackers.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Change your email password and your security questions. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Notify everyone on your contact list. Tell them to watch for any suspicious emails from you. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Scan your computer with an updated anti-virus program. </font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Where to report:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plainlarge">Report this scam to your local police, the RCMP or the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.</a></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Share details of the scam with your friends and relatives. </font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Learn more about <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">how and where to report fraud</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Sign up to receive <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/fraud-alerts.html" class="plainlarge">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your inbox.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-10-10T07:00:09-07:00 FRAUD ALERT: Email iTunes Gift Card Scam FRAUD ALERT: Advance loan scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38680379 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17876782" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2eb/0c8/27d/Advance-loan-scam.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">FRAUD ALERT: Advance loan scam </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Online lenders are targeting New Brunswickers to offer them fraudulent loans, FCNB warns. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">While many online lending options may be legitimate, there is also a rise of scam artists offering fake loans to unsuspecting consumers.  </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><b>How the Advance Loan Scam Works:</b> </div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">A consumer applies for a loan and it seems to be approved or guaranteed.  However, when the consumer contacts the company to receive the funds, the company requests a fee (such as a deposit or loan insurance) before the funds will be transferred.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Once the scam artist receives the payment from the consumer, they disappear.  Their contact lines are disconnected or they simply ignore consumer inquiries.  Often the website is shut down only to reappear under a different name so the scammer can continue to target unsuspecting consumers and avoid being pursued by law enforcement.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Victims of the advance loan scam report that the websites appear legitimate. For example, they may display a licensing number, a tax number, or incorporate digital signature technology on their platform to give it the semblance of being real. </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">In these situations, the names of the company targeting consumers may change but the scam remains relatively similar. It’s important to know the red flags of this scam.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>How to recognize a loan scam:</b></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You’re asked for a fee or deposit before receiving the funds.  In Canada, it’s illegal for lenders to request a deposit before the loan is given. If a lender asks for advance funds to “secure” or “confirm” a loan, it’s a scam. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You’re contacted out of the blue by phone or internet.  Unsolicited loan offers may be legitimate, but proceed with caution.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You are guaranteed a loan or interest rate regardless of your credit history. Legitimate lenders use your credit history to determine if they will lend you money, and at what rate.  </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You’re asked to send payments using gift cards such as iTunes, or wire transfer service such as Western Union.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>What to do if I suspect a loan is a scam:</b></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do your research. Scammers use names that sound like legitimate company names, to try and trick you into feeling safe.  If you’re unsure, do an internet search for the company name followed by the word scam. If you see many results attesting it’s a scam, tread very carefully. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Often, fraudulent sites will display a page about their “board of directors”, but steal the pictures of the board members from other, legitimate websites. A reverse image search can help you determine if their board members are really who they claim. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Verify the company exists.  Get a physical address that you can verify or get the company’s contact information from directory assistance or the phone book. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be cautious of lenders that are based outside of Canada, because if it is a scam, it will be particularly tough to get your money back.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be careful where you share your personal information.  If you do not trust the website or company and if you can’t verify that it is legitimate, do not share sensitive information. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Even if documents appear legit, tread carefully because it’s easy to fake “official” looking paperwork.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Remember, just because they advertise through a recognized media outlet such as Facebook, does not mean the company is legitimate.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Report it with the RCMP. They may already know about this and tell you whether a company is fraudulent or not.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>Where to report loan scams:</b></font></div><div class="plain">Report online loan scams to the RCMP.  </div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Being informed is the best way to protect yourself from frauds and scams. Learn more about <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">how to report fraud</a> and <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plainlarge">where to report fraud</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Sign up to receive <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/subscribe.html" class="plainlarge">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your inbox.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-10-09T11:36:53-07:00 FRAUD ALERT: Advance loan scam Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Identity Theft vs Identity Fraud http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38653824 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/08d/248/0e3/Identity-Theft-and-Identity-Fraud.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17863859"><font style="" class="heading1">CAFC Bulletin: Identity Theft vs Identity Fraud</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"> </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><i><br></i></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><i>Identity Theft</i> refers to the collection or acquisition of someone else’s personal information to conduct other criminal activities. Identity Theft can occur through the telephone, email, regular mail or the internet.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><i>Identity Fraud</i> is the actual use of another person’s information, living or deceased, in connection with fraud. This includes impersonation and the misuse of debit or credit card data.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Fraudsters use a range of techniques to acquire a consumer’s identity. It can be as simple as obtaining personal information through a dumpster dive, direct call or through sophisticated means using technology such as phishing, skimming, malware, spyware and viruses.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">While consumers may not suffer immediate financial losses, they can spend hours alerting financial institutions and the credit bureaus. In addition, they may have difficulty obtaining credit or re‐establishing a good credit rating in the future.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be wary of unsolicited emails, phone calls or mail asking for personal or financial information.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be aware of creditors or collection agency calls about an application or account you do not have.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Stay current. Check your bank and credit card statements monthly and report any suspicious activity. Report any missing mail or statements right away.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Beware of unsolicited emails or text messages stating you have a refund and asking to enter your personal or financial information to deposit the money.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Properly dispose all personal and financial documents (i.e. shredding).</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Obtain a free credit report (available once a year) through the two credit bureaus, Equifax and TransUnion.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Beware of unsolicited emails or text messages demanding payment.</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre at 1‐888‐495‐8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/" class="plainlarge">www.antifraudcentre.ca</a><font style="" class="plain"> .</font></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-09-17T10:00:05-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Identity Theft vs Identity Fraud FRAUD ALERT - Rental Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646399 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/Rental-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859014">Rental scam: no room for error </font><br><br></div><div class="plain">August 16, 2018 – OTTAWA, ON – Competition Bureau<font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">It’s peak moving season. Students are leaving the nest; parents are helping them find the right place. Beware: if a rental listing looks too good to be true, it probably is. School might not have started yet, but do your homework and learn to recognize rental scams.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">In a typical rental scam, fraudsters will entice you with a very attractive listing: sought after area, great amenities and low price. Ads will be posted on popular sites like Kijiji or Facebook. Scammers may use photos from an old listing, from a house that’s up for sale, or from short-term rental sites like Airbnb, to make it look authentic. They pose as the landlord and may claim to be abroad and unable to meet in person to show you inside the place.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">After a few emails or text messages, they will start asking for money. First, they’ll try to get a security deposit, then, they’ll ask for the first month’s rent, and then another month’s rent in exchange for a discount. They can even try to rush you into a decision by saying that others are also interested in the property. Don’t give in. It could be a scam.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Here are some warning signs to look out for when shopping for a rental:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">the monthly rent is lower than other similar places</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">you're asked to leave a deposit without any formal rental agreement or lease in place</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">you're asked to send money to someone outside the country</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">when you ask about the apartment, you get an email that sends you to a website asking for personal or financial information</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">ads show pictures of the outside of the property only, or pictures that don't match the actual property or address</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Here’s what you can do to avoid being scammed:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Go to the address, make sure the listing is truthful and accurate. If you are unable to go in person, use the Internet to see actual images of the rental.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Research the address to ensure it is not a duplicate post. You may even conduct a <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/1325808?hl=en" class="plainlarge">reverse image</a> search to see if the photos were used elsewhere.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Schedule a showing and confirm that the landlord will be present.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you plan on renting in a new development, contact the builder to confirm ownership.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Request a lease or contract. Review it thoroughly.</font></li><li class="plainlarge">Be sure to know your rights as a tenant. Consult <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.consumerhandbook.ca/en/topics/housing/landlord-and-tenant-problems#related" class="plainlarge">your provincial or territorial department or ministry of housing.</a></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you’ve been the victim of a rental scam or another type of fraud, or if you have information about this type of scam, report it to the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre</a> (1-888-495-8501), the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/scams-fraudes/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">RCMP</a> or your local police.</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">This consumer alert was created in collaboration with the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre</a> and the <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/financial-consumer-agency.html" class="plainlarge">Financial Consumer Agency of Canada</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-08-20T11:00:56-07:00 FRAUD ALERT - Rental Scam FRAUD ALERT: Extortion Scam (A new twist) http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646424 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859041" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2d0/3d9/1e3/Extortion-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">FRAUD ALERT: Extortion Scam (A new twist)</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">New Brunswickers are being targeted with extortion scam emails with a new twist – one aimed at making it more likely they will be scared into paying a blackmail fee. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Extortion scams refer to any person who unlawfully tries to obtain money, property or services from a person, entity or institution through coercion. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">In this latest version,  the victim receives an email suggesting they have been recorded through their webcam while they watched adult websites. The scam artist demands a ransom to be paid in Bitcoin within a certain time period, with the threat to circulate the recording to the victim’s social media and email contacts if payment is not made. The new twist to this old scam is that the email references a real password that the victim may have used in the past, which gives it the appearance of legitimacy.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How to recognize this type of Scam</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">The email may:</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">begin with: “I’m aware that <password formerly used by victim> is your password.” The scammer has likely harvested emails and previously used passwords from the dark web, or has gained access to a list of compromised passwords from a data breach.</li><li class="plain">try to convince the victim not to report the email to police or to tell anyone why they are purchasing Bitcoin.</li><li class="plain">be poorly written and contain grammatical mistakes.</li></ul></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">What to do if you receive an email like this:</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">If you receive a similar email, ignore it and don’t reply to it. Stay calm, don’t panic and do report it.</li><li class="plain">Do not click any links or open any attachments to the email.  They would likely install malware or ransomware on your device.</li><li class="plain">If you are still using the password referenced in the email, change it.</li></ul></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Tips to protect yourself online:</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">Disable your webcam or any other camera connected to the Internet when you are not using it. Hackers are able to obtain remote access and record if certain malware has been installed on your computer.</li><li class="plain">Use a reliable antivirus program.</li><li class="plain">Use strong and unique passwords. Check out this <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/cybersecurity.html?fb_38110945_anch=38125055" class="plain">cybersecurity tip</a> for good password management.</li></ul></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Where to report :</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">Report this scam to your local police, the RCMP or the <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plain">Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre</a>. </li><li class="plain">Share details of the scam with your friends and relatives. Every paid ransom is feeding another similar attack on other people, and the next victim could be someone you love. </li></ul></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Learn more about <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plain">how to report fraud</a> and <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plain">where to report fraud</a>.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Sign up to receive <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/fraud-alerts.html" class="plain">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your inbox.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-07-24T12:28:44-07:00 FRAUD ALERT: Extortion Scam (A new twist) FRAUD ALERT: Cavendish Beach Music Festival Ticket Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646416 <p class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859033" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/Cavendish-Beach-Music-Festival-Ticket-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">FRAUD ALERT: Cavendish Beach Music Festival Ticket Scam</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2">Beware of scammers selling duplicate tickets on online classified sites</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Deals can be steals in disguise</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">RCMP are warning people to be cautious about buying tickets to the Cavendish Beach Music Festival posted for sale on classified websites, such as Kijiji. The Mounties are investigating a case of fraud in P.E.I. involving tickets being resold online to this year’s annual festival. Another scam involves fraudsters selling campground sites that don’t exist. </font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"> </font> </p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How this scam works</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">A private, online seller posts an ad for tickets to the popular summer festival or a booked campsite at a reduced cost or best offer. Money is exchanged and the tickets are sent to the buyer electronically. However, the seller is selling the same electronic ticket multiple times. In the P.E.I. case, the tickets were never sent.  In the campsite scam, the money is transferred, but the campsite booking is fake.</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"> </font> </p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How you should protect yourself?</font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"> </font></p><p class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The best way to avoid these scams is to be aware of them in the first place. The RCMP also recommend asking for a copy of the seller’s identification should the tickets prove to be duplicates or having the seller transfer the tickets into the buyer’s name.</font></p> FCNB 2018-07-04T07:00:07-07:00 FRAUD ALERT: Cavendish Beach Music Festival Ticket Scam Becoming your own boss: yes, but not at any cost http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646418 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859035" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/Pyramid-Scheme-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">Becoming your own boss: yes, but not at any cost</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2">The difference between an illegal pyramid scheme and a legitimate multi-level marketing plan</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">June 27, 2018 – OTTAWA, ON – Competition Bureau</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do you dream of being your own boss and setting your own hours? Are you trying to find the perfect side-gig that will increase your bank balance? A multi-level marketing plan is one option that you may come across. Contrary to popular belief, they are not the same as pyramid schemes. While the first is completely legal, the second is not.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you join a multi-level marketing plan, you essentially become a salesperson of goods such as jewellery, health supplements or beauty products. At the same time, you can recruit others to expand the network. As your business grows, you get opportunities to earn more and more money. All along, the focus is on earning money by selling your products.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Pyramid schemes look a lot like their legal cousin but traditionally focus on generating profits by recruiting others.  Often, you are encouraged to pay large membership fees upfront to join. The only way for you to make any money is to convince more people to join the scam and give up their hard-earned money. People are often persuaded to join by family members or friends.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Before signing up:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Research the business: check different websites, consult many reviews. If something seems fishy, walk away.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Beware of multi-level marketing plans that promote huge profits using only their highest earners as examples.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Know that they must disclose the compensation actually received or likely to be received by a typical participant.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Watch out for plans that:</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><ul><ul><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">have compensation plans focused on recruiting new members.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">don't include a reasonable buy-back guarantee or refund policy, allowing you to send back your extra products at the end of your career. If they don’t provide it proactively, ask to see it. Plan operators have to tell you about it.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">force you into buying excessive quantities of products.</font></li></ul></ul></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Don’t be fooled by “get rich quick” promises. These plans often end-up requiring just as much work as any other job.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Promises of financial freedom with minimal effort are always enticing. But success stems from hard work, determination and doing your research. Before you sign up, be sure the opportunity is right for you. Avoid plans that don't provide all the details or could be pyramid schemes.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you have information about an illegal pyramid scheme or any other type of fraud, report it to the <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/h_04118.html" class="plainlarge">Competition Bureau</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>Associated links</b></font></div><div class="plain"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/03799.html" class="plainlarge">Multi-level Marketing Plans and Schemes of Pyramid Selling</a></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/03074.html#s3_0" class="plainlarge">Pyramid schemes</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://bc.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=2081&languageId=1&contentId=54678" class="plainlarge">Help Stop the ‘Gifting’ Pyramid Scheme (by the RCMP)</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://nvan.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=2120&languageId=1&contentId=55352" class="plainlarge">Reminder: A gift is only a gift when there is no expectation of any return (by the RCMP)</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/h_04118.html" class="plainlarge">Consumer and business alerts</a></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-06-29T08:26:48-07:00 Becoming your own boss: yes, but not at any cost Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Door to Door Scams http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646395 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2d0/3d9/1e3/CAFC-Door-to-Door-Scams-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859010">CAFC Bulletin: Door to Door Scams</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Door‐to‐Door scams continue to pose a threat to Canadian consumers and businesses. Door to door sales people can use high pressure tactics and can be aggressive in nature. Consumers may find themselves in a situation where they purchase a product or sign up for a service they neither need nor want.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Some common door‐to‐door scams reported to the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre include solicitations for a charitable donation, an investment opportunity or a service scam involving the sale or maintenance of an appliance.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Door‐to‐door sales rules can vary from province to province. For instance, on March 1, 2018, Ontario banned unsolicited, door‐to‐door sales of certain household appliances to better protect consumers from aggressive and misleading contracting at home. The new rules apply to air cleaners, air conditioners, air purifiers, duct cleaning services, furnaces, water filters, water heaters, water purifiers, water softeners, water treatment devices as well as bundles of these goods and services.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Know your rights, look up your Provincial and Territorial Consumers Affairs Office at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.consumerhandbook.ca/en/" class="plainlarge">www.consumerhandbook.ca</a> – most Provinces and Territories have guidelines under their Consumer Protection Act (CPA)</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs ‐ How to Protect Yourself:</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Ask for photo ID, get the name of the person and the name of the company or charity they represent.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Ask for a charities breakdown of where funds are allocated. Be sure to get it in writing.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never share any personal information or copies of any bills or financial statements.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Research before you invest. Don’t sign anything and always read the fine print.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If a contract is signed within the home you have a cooling off period. For example, in Ontario consumers have the right to cancel a contract for any reason within a 10 day cooling off period. For water heater contracts, there is a 20 day cooling off period.</font></li><li class="plainlarge">Know your rights. Look up your Provincial and Territorial Consumers Affairs Office at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.consumerhandbook.ca/en/" class="plainlarge">www.consumerhandbook.ca</a> – most Provinces and Territories have guidelines under their Consumer Protection Act (CPA).</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Visit <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/" class="plainlarge">www.antifraudcentre.ca</a> under Fraud Types for additional information on these particular scams.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre at 1‐888‐495‐8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-06-28T08:13:08-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Door to Door Scams Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: New Extortion Scam Variant http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646420 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859037" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/CAFC-Extortion-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">CAFC: New Extortion Scam Variant</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">This bulletin was created to provide awareness regarding a new twist with Extortion Scams currently targeting Chinese Communities and tips on how to avoid becoming a victim.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be cautious when answering automated calls with an urgent message. The Asian community in Canada is being targeted with calls claiming to be the Beijing Police, Interpol, the Chinese Consulate or in some cases a delivery agency. There are  different variations in the scam calls. They will involve a message that claims a letter or package in your name was intercepted, and implicates you in the fraud. For example, the message will state, “a suspicious package containing numerous bank cards has been stopped at customs and you are the subject of an investigation”. The suspect may also direct you to go to a fake “Police” website to verify your identity, which includes providing a copy of your passport. In some cases, the fraudsters will also say that you have fraudulent funds in your account. They will ask for your banking information for verification. These calls can be very intimidating and threatening. Please hang up and report the incident to your nearest police department or the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do not trust your call display. It may say "Police”. In reality, it may be an actual scammer. It does not matter what the caller ID says, you cannot trust it.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you get an urgent call from someone stating they represent a company or a government agency seeking personal information, hang up. Call the phone number on your account statement, in the phone book or on the company or government agency's website to verify the authenticity of the request.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never give out personal information in response to unexpected calls. This includes account numbers, social insurance number (SIN), mother's maiden name, passport information, passwords or any information about your identity.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre at 1-888‐495‐8501 or report online at <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-06-14T07:30:11-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: New Extortion Scam Variant Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Business E-mail Compromise http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646428 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">  </font></div><div class="plain"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/CAFC-Business-Email-Compromise-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859045"><font style="" class="heading2">CAFC Bulletin: Business E-mail Compromise (BEC) </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2"><b>Recognize, Reject and Report it!</b></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="customtext2">According to recent cybercrime statistics, BEC has stolen more than $5 billion dollars from unsuspecting victims worldwide, including Canadian businessesi. BEC is the second highest for monetary loss out of over 40 fraud types reported to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC). It’s real, it’s growing, but with increased awareness, it can be prevented.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1">Recognize it! </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">What is BEC?</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">BEC, also known as CEO fraud, wire fraud, or business executive scam, is a sophisticated scheme that tricks a business into paying a sum of money to a fraudster. The BEC scheme is executed through the use of social engineering<font style="" class="plainsmall">(1)</font> or computer intrusion techniques. Several types of BEC schemes have been observed in Canada:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>BEC scheme #1</b>: Involves spoofed<font style="" class="plainsmall">(2)</font> or compromised<font style="" class="plainsmall">(3)</font> e-mail accounts belonging to high-level executives where an e-mail is sent from that account to another employee, often someone who conducts financial transactions for the company, requesting them to conduct a wire transfer for what appears to be a valid business reason.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>BEC scheme #2:</b> Involves businesses that have well established relationships with suppliers. The criminal, using a spoofed or compromised e-mail account of the business, requests the supplier to provide payment via wire transfer to a fraudulent account.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>Other BEC scenarios:</b> These include: requests for data such as tax information to later be used for fraudulent activity; requests for a “legitimate” invoice payment only to be discovered as false when the actual vendor calls seeking status of an invoice payment; and malicious actors contacting businesses and disguising themselves as lawyers claiming to be handling confidential or time-sensitive matters. There are additional variations of BEC, with new schemes being developed regularly.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1">Reject it! </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How can I protect my business?</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Focus on education and prevention for employees by training them on good security practices.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be aware of seemingly legitimate but unsolicited e-mails requesting wire transfers with pressure to act quickly or requests for secrecy.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Look closely at the e-mail address – it may look similar but is slightly altered: i.e. if the real address is: abc-123@mail.ca, then the spoofed address might be: abc_123@mail.ca or abc123@mail.ca.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Create intrusion detection system rules that flag e-mails with extensions that are similar to the company e-mail and register all internet domains that are slightly different than the actual company domain<font style="" class="plainsmall">(4)</font>. </font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Consider a two-step verification process for wire transfer payments. Contact the source through another means of communication (e.g. by phone) to confirm the request is legitimate. Do not rely on e-mail alone.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Implement a dual-signature system with dual authentication (the use of a security token), requiring at least two authorized signatures from two different personnel for wire transfers.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Watch for poorly written communications with obvious grammatical errors or awkward language that is not commonly used in Canada. More sophisticated scams, however, will use familiar language and grammar used in your daily correspondence.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Know the habits of your clients, including the reason, detail and amount of payments. Beware of any significant changes.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Never open e-mails or click on attachments from an unknown address as they can contain malware used to compromise accounts.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Start a new e-mail thread rather than replying directly to an e-mail request to transfer funds.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Limit the personnel and financial information posted online to social media and company websites, including when a CEO or CFO is on vacation, and the names and positions of financial officers. Fraudsters will use this information to conduct research, time their scam, and develop future targets.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Ensure all software, including anti-virus software, is up to date on all computers, servers and devices including mobile phones and tablets.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Other measures:</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be wary of using free, web-based e-mail accounts for your business, which are more susceptible to being compromised.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Be aware of an increase in phishing e-mails, as this may be an indicator of a future BEC attempt.Ensure all staff know to report these e-mails to the company’s Information Technology Security branch.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Consider using whitelisting for trusted e-mail addresses and/or trusted domains. E-mail from unknown addresses can be blocked or flagged.</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">______________________</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">1 - The use of deception to manipulate individuals into divulging confidential or personal information that may be used for fraudulent purposes (non-technical intrusion).</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">2 - Email spoofing is the forgery of an email header so that the message appears to have originated from someone other than the actual source.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"> 3 - The e-mail account has been “hacked” into. A fraudster has access to the e-mail account.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">4 - This in an increasingly used method and is also called a doppelganger domain name. A doppelganger domain name is a legally registered domain name that has been created by threat actors because it appears to be almost identical to the legitimate domain name of a targeted organization.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1">Report it! </font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How should my business respond? </font></div><div class="plain">1. If the e-mail is identified as fraudulent <b>AFTER</b> funds have been transferred:</div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">A) <b>Immediately report</b> the incident to your financial institution. Share the following information:</font></div></blockquote><div class="plain"><ul><ul><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">the amount</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">the account destination</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">other pertinent details from the request</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">ask about recalling the transfer</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">be sure they contact the recipient financial institution</font></li></ul></ul></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">B)<b> Report</b> the incident to local police. Identify the incident as “BEC” or wire fraud. The criminal code offences would be S. 380 (Fraud) of the Criminal Code of Canada (CCC) and/or S. 403 (Identity Fraud), CCC. This is NOT a civil matter. This also applies to cases of attempted BEC.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If a computer intrusion technique was attempted or used, there are additional criminal offences that have been committed such as S. 342.1, CCC (Unauthorized use of a computer) or S.430 (1.1), CCC (Mischief in relation to computer data). Be ready to share all details of the incident.</font></div></blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">C)<b> Consider</b> developing a plan to respond to media inquiries about any potential loss.</font></div></blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">D) <b>Report </b>the incident to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC) online 24/7 at: <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/index-eng.htm</a>, select “Report an Incident”, and the link to the “Fraud Reporting System (FRS)”, or alternatively call CAFC at 1-888-495-8501, between 9:00 am and 4:45 pm EST Monday to Friday and;</font></div></blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">E)<b> Report </b>the incident to the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) via e-mail at: <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="mailto:ps.cyberincident-cyberincident.sp@canada.ca" class="plainlarge">ps.cyberincident-cyberincident.sp@canada.ca</a>, or visit: <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/ntnl-scrt/" class="plainlarge">https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/ntnl-scrt/cbr-scrt/ccirc-ccric-en.aspx</a> for more information. CCIRC will assist in mitigation and prevention, especially in cases where a technical compromise may have occurred. Advise CCIRC whether the police have been contacted.</font></div></blockquote><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain">2. If the e-mail is identified as fraudulent <b>BEFORE</b> anyfunds are transferred:</div><div class="plain"><ul><ul><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Follow steps <b>1B, 1D and 1E </b>above.</font></li></ul></ul></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">3. If applicable to your business:</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><ul><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Brief senior management and/or boardmembers of the incident.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Conduct an internal IT forensic investigation and consider bringing in outside security specialists to assist.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Investigate possible security policy violations, and develop a plan to resolve security deficiencies.</font></li></ul></ul></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="alert"><b><font style="" class="plainlarge"><b>We strongly suggest that you REPORT THE INCIDENT for the following reasons:</b></font></b></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="alert"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Regardless if funds were or were not transferred a criminal act has occurred. Please remember that every report counts and is a valuable tool for investigators.</font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If the scam is not reported, there is no record of the incident; therefore the scale and scope of this fraudulent activity cannot be understood or investigated.</font><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do not be afraid or embarrassed to report the incident. Perpetrators are using more sophisticated techniques that can deceive even the most informed businesses.</font></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Additional information can be found at:</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">Get Cyber Safe – <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.getcybersafe.gc.ca/" class="plain">https://www.getcybersafe.gc.ca</a></li><li class="plain">Competition Bureau – <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/04201.html" class="plain">http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/04201.html</a></li><li class="plain">FBI Internet Crime Complaint Centre (IC3) – <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.ic3.gov/media/2016/160614.aspx#fn1" class="plain">https://www.ic3.gov/media/2016/160614.aspx#fn1</a></li><li class="plain">Global Cyber Alliance <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.globalcyberalliance.org/" class="plain">https://www.globalcyberalliance.org</a></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><span style="" class="plain">______________________</span></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">i – Latest FBI BEC stats found at: <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.ic3.gov/media/2017/170504.aspx" class="plainsmall">https://www.ic3.gov/media/2017/170504.aspx</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Federal Policing Criminal Operations. For any enquiries concerning the information, please contact the originator of the document.</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-06-08T10:00:28-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Business E-mail Compromise Pop-up surveys can be a) scams b) traps c) costly? http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646421 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/Surveys-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" border="0" size="250" daid="17859038"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><font style="" class="heading1">Pop-up surveys can be a) scams b) traps c) costly?</font><br><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><font style="" class="highlight">Answer: all of the above!</font><br><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">May 24, 2018 – OTTAWA, ON – Competition Bureau</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Have you ever come across those annoying pop-up windows or online surveys? They often claim that you’ll get a free product in exchange for a few minutes of your time to complete the survey. After answering several questions about your telecom services, your skin care needs or your experience shopping at wholesale stores or pharmacies, you’re offered your choice of several free products.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>To obtain your free product, you’re directed to click through to a website which takes you to yet another website. That website turns out to be a <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/04333.html#sec02" class="plainlarge">subscription trap</a>. These websites are intended to trick you into believing that you’ll just pay a small shipping fee to receive your so-called free product. Instead, you’ll end up locked into paying a monthly fee.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>Scammers will try to pique your interest by using larger-than-life statements or slogans on websites, social media or even emails. These types of ads, often referred to as “clickbait”, are meant to entice you into taking a specific action, such as visiting a webpage, watching a video or answering a survey.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>Avoid throwing your money out of the window by recognizing the red flags:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">You’re asked for your credit card number even though the reward offered is free.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Ads or sponsored content includes exaggerated slogans or provocative images that entice you to click through.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The survey URL doesn’t end in “.com”, “.ca” or “.org” unlike most legitimate company websites in Canada.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Surveys include multiple choice boxes that don’t have to be ticked for you to progress to the next question.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The timer, if there is one, restarts after a certain period of time.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The survey is short, the questions very general and the survey doesn’t seem to be very useful.</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>Here are a few extra precautions you can take to protect yourself:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ul><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Avoid pop-up surveys, especially if they offer free products – these are often a trap!</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Use your browser’s pop-up ad blocker (a quick search online will help you figure out how to do it on your browser).</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Do not assume a survey is legitimate just because it appears to be from your internet service provider (ISP), scammers can determine who your ISP is by reading your IP address.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If prompted to complete a survey from your ISP, verify with your ISP that they have sent out the survey.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If a pop-up window is particularly difficult to get rid of, consider turning off your computer. On mobile devices, restarting your device can sometimes solve the problem.</font></li><li class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If pop-up windows persist you may be dealing with malware. Keep your anti-malware software up to date and regularly run a scan to detect possible issues.</font></li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br>If you’ve been the victim of a fraudulent “free product” offer or another type of fraud, or if you have information about this type of scam, report it to the <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/h_00019.html" class="plainlarge">Competition Bureau</a>.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-05-29T05:30:43-07:00 Pop-up surveys can be a) scams b) traps c) costly? Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Bank Investigator Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646394 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/CAFC-Bank-Investigator-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859009"><font style="" class="heading1">CAFC Bulletin: Bank Investigator Scam</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre (CAFC) is receiving increased reporting from victims that have been misled by scammers portraying themselves as representatives of financial institutions, law enforcement or other officials. These scammers claim there is a suspicious charge on the victim’s credit card. The CAFC is seeing many variations of the scam. The following is a summary highlighting some of the commonalities.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Scammers may call victims on landlines in the early morning and claim a suspicious charge was done in the middle of the night on the victim’s credit card. They claim the charge is either from an online purchase, in store transaction or overseas transfer. They then state they require the victims’ credit card to cancel</font><font style="" class="plainlarge">the transaction.</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">In some cases, victims are transferred to an alleged investigator. More commonly, they are requested to immediately call the number on the back of their credit card to verify the validity of the initial call.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">When victims believe they have hung up, the original caller, not having actually disconnected, redirects the victims to imposters. At this time, the victims are persuaded to transfer funds to an external bank account to safeguard their funds until the ‘investigation’ is complete. In this variation of the scam, the fraudsters are calling victims on landlines.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">In other cases, scammers will gain access to the victim’s computer to continue the alleged ‘investigation.’ Victims are then shown a fraudulent transaction on their online banking account. The scammers indicate they want the victims' help in an ongoing ‘investigation’ against the criminals who stole their money. The  alleged bank investigator and/or law enforcement official indicates they will send the victim a deposit of funds, which the complainant will then send overseas as part of the ‘investigation’. When the deposit appears in the victim’s account the complainant sends the money to help in the ongoing investigation. It is not until the transfers are completed that the victim realizes funds were never deposited into their </font><font style="" class="plainlarge">account.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">Calls to landlines from scammers in the ‘Bank Investigator’ scam tend to happen in the early morning, oftentimes when a victim is still sleeping and not yet alert. Be alert when dealing with financial matters</li><li class="plain">Financial institutions will never request transferring funds to an external account for security reasons</li><li class="plain">Criminals use “Call‐Spoofing” to mislead victims. Do not assume that phone numbers appearing on call display are accurate. This call‐spoofing technology is easily available.</li><li class="plain">Never provide remote access to your computer systems to unknown callers.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud at 1-888-495-8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified,copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-04-17T08:00:39-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Bank Investigator Scam Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Cryptocurrency http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646403 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/CAFC-Cryptocurrency-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859020">CAFC Bulletin: Cryptocurrency</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre (CAFC) is receiving reports from Canadian victims of mass marketing fraud who have sent money through a cryptocurrency, such as Bitcoin. Cryptocurrencies operate independently of a central bank and are currently unregulated in Canada. Bitcoin is the most common cryptocurrency being reported to the CAFC. However, there are many other cryptocurrencies emerging, such as Monero, Ethereum, Dash etc.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">While an increasing number of businesses are accepting cryptocurrencies as a form of payment, the CAFC warns that there is no protection from fraud when using them. Moreover, no government agencies will ever request payment in the form of cryptocurrencies.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">Beware of scams involving a request or demand for a transfer of funds using Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency.</li><li class="plain">Beware of offers to invest in initial coin offerings, which refers to the development of new cryptocurrency.</li><li class="plain">No government agency will request payment in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.</li><li class="plain">Beware of requests to withdraw funds and deposit into a bitcoin wallet via bitcoin ATM.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre at 1‐ 888‐495‐8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-04-13T10:00:26-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Cryptocurrency Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Continuity Scam http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646407 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859026" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2d0/3d9/1e3/CAFC-Continuity-Scam-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250">CAFC Bulletin: Continuity Scam</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">As E-Commerce continues to grow, so do the opportunities to become a victim through online purchases – specifically with a credit card. Continuity scams largely take place when someone who is online observes a pop-up or advertisement offering a free trial or free gift upon completion of a survey. Consumers who participate are often asked to provide a credit card to pay for shipping and handling. Unless victims review the terms and conditions, it is unlikely they will see the hidden fees associated to the offer, which includes overpriced monthly charges that are nearly impossible to cancel.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">Continuity scams offer free weight loss pills or free subscriptions to health & beauty products– assuming you sign up and provide a credit card for shipping. Victims will receive their product and witness a charge to their credit card. The prices can vary from $1.99 to $1,000 and victims will continue to be charged until the company is contacted and services cancelled. Additionally, it is not uncommon for victims to be charged more than once per month by multiple different</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">merchants.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">In order to stop the fraud, victims should contact the suspected company requesting a stop payment and keep records of all correspondence. Victims can also refuse delivery of goods and should contact their respective financial institution or credit card provider to request a charge back due to fraud.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">Warning signs - How to protect yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain">Review all fine print as well as terms and conditions before making a purchase.</li><li class="plain">Conduct your own searches of the internet to see if anybody has suggested the offer is a scam.</li><li class="plain">Beware of paid advertisements online. Paid banner ads are not always affiliated to the website you are viewing. </li><li class="plain">Review credit card statements regularly for unauthorized charges.</li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501 or report online at <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-03-12T10:00:28-07:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Continuity Scam FRAUD ALERT – Aidan Trading http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646391 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><img width="250" align="left" daid="17859008" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/06c/235/121/Aidan-Trading-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" border="0" size="250"><font style="" class="heading1">FRAUD ALERT – Aidan Trading</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://www.aidantrading.com/" class="plain">Aidan Trading</a> claims to provide an online trading platform for forex, forex options, commodities and contracts for difference (CFD). </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">We recently became aware that Aidan Trading made an unsolicited offer to a New Brunswick resident. Since it is not registered to trade in, or advise on, securities or derivatives in New Brunswick, it is illegal for the company to carry out these activities in the province.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">What are forex and contracts for difference (CFDs)?</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">The forex market, also referred to as the Foreign Exchange or FX market, is basically the simultaneous buying of one currency while selling another. Profits and losses depend on the fluctuations in the exchange rate between the two currencies. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">A CFD is a complex derivative product that is often offered by firms to retail clients through online platforms. CFDs allow investors to speculate on the price movements of an underlying asset (such as a share, index, currency or commodity) without acquiring ownership of the underlying asset.    </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">If you have been solicited to trade in forex or CFDs, you need to know how to spot a forex or CFD scam.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">How to recognize a forex or CFD scam?</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><b>Sounds too good to be true:</b> Get rich schemes, including those involving forex, tend to be scams.  Remember, there is no such thing as a “free lunch.” </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><b>Heavily promoted:</b>  Forex scams are promoted as an “exciting opportunity” to invest on the foreign exchange (forex) market.  Usually these ads appear in newspapers and on radio, TV or websites. The ads may look legitimate but what usually happens is that your money is not invested in anything.  It is simply stolen by the scam artist.  </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><b>Promises of high returns: </b>The scam offers to pool your money in a fund that will be managed by expert currency traders. They guarantee little or no risk and high investment returns. Some scams may hold “purchased” gold (or other valuable currencies) in a “secure vault” and promise to sell it as it increases in value. Most of the time, the gold does not exist. If your money is invested in the forex market, you may not have been told that the investment is very risky and you’re likely to lose some or all of your money. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><b>Training:</b> Promoters will try to get you to sign paperwork, attend trading seminars, or buy software that will unlock the mysteries of the forex market or CFDs. When you respond, sellers or their affiliates may encourage you to invest in a forex or CFD opportunity. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><b>Wire money:</b>  Once they provide you with a contract, they encourage you to wire your money offshore. Be aware that once you transfer funds to a foreign firm, it may be difficult or impossible to get your money back.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="highlight">What to do if you are targeted?</font></div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Anybody who has been approached or targeted to invest in Aidan Trading is asked to contact the commission toll-free at 1-866-933-2222, or through its website at fcnb.ca. </div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Learn more about <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="https://www.securities-administrators.ca/investortools.aspx?id=1041&terms=FOREX" class="plain">forex</a>.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Learn more about <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/how-to-report-fraud.html" class="plain">how to report fraud</a> and <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/where-to-report-fraud.html" class="plain">where to report fraud</a>.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><div class="plain">Sign up to receive <a link="" rel="" target="_blank" href="http://fcnb.ca/subscribe.html" class="plain">fraud alerts</a> delivered to your inbox.</div><div class="plain"><br></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-03-05T10:57:44-08:00 FRAUD ALERT – Aidan Trading Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Tax Scams http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646417 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2d0/3d9/1e3/CAFC-Tax-Scams-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859034"></font><font style="" class="heading1">CAFC Bulletin: Tax Scams</font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC) continues to receive reports of emails, text messages and telephone calls related to tax scams. Tax scams can involve the following:</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><ol><li class="plain">Fraudsters are calling consumers impersonating the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and claiming that a recent audit has identified discrepancies from past filed taxes. Repayment is required immediately. Fraudsters threaten consumers that failure to pay will result in additional fees, jail time and/or deportation. Fraudsters may request payment via money service business, pre-paid cards / gift cards (iTunes) or bitcoin.</li><li class="plain">Consumers receive an email or text message indicating a refund is pending from the CRA. The email includes a link that directs consumers to a website that looks like the actual CRA. Consumers are asked to fill in their personal information such as Social Insurance Number (SIN), Date of Birth (DOB) and banking information before receiving the refund (email money transfer). Victims who input their personal information are subject to identity fraud. No refund is ever issued.</li></ol><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">In most cases, the CRA will use registered mail to contact consumers – not email or phone.</li><li class="plain">Contact the CRA directly to confirm you owe back taxes or are entitled to a refund.</li><li class="plain">Never provide personal information over the telephone, by text or email.</li><li class="plain">The CRA would never request payment by money service business, iTunes gift cards or bitcoin.</li><li class="plain">For more information about frauds involving the CRA, visit <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency.html" class="plain">www.cra-arc.gc.ca</a></li><li class="plain">If you’ve shared personal information, contact Equifax and Trans Union to place fraud alerts on your account.</li><li class="plain">If you’ve shared banking information with the scammers, contact your financial institution to place alerts on your account.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainsmall"><span displayText="Facebook" class="st_facebook_large"></span> <span displayText="Tweet" class="st_twitter_large"></span> <span displayText="LinkedIn" class="st_linkedin_large"></span> <span displayText="Email" class="st_email_large"></span> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script src="http://w.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "e727b6e4-f329-44bf-81ed-7fbcea81edbd"}); </script><br></font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-03-01T06:00:39-08:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Tax Scams Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Scams Targeting Seniors http://fcnb.ca/pc_url_38646423 <p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="heading1"><img width="250" align="left" src='//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/2d0/3d9/1e3/CAFC-Scams-Targeting-Seniors-EN.jpg' style="margin: 15px 15px 15px 0px;float: left" height="288" size="250" border="0" daid="17859040">CAFC Bulletin: Scams Targeting Seniors </font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge">This fraud bulletin was prepared to highlight four scams currently targeting senior Canadians. Each scam is outlined below and includes warning signs and ways to protect yourself.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Prize Scams</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><font style="" class="plainlarge">Canadian seniors are solicited over the phone, email, through the mail or via social media websites claiming that they are the winner of a large lottery or sweepstake. Recently, the CAFC has received reports where seniors receive a call from an individual who claims to represent “Reader’s Digest”, or “Publisher’s Clearing House”. Scammers advise that you have won a prize (cash and car) and in order to receive the winnings you are required to pay a small advance fee to cover taxes or legal fees associated to the win. After the fee is paid, no prize is ever received. Scammers target seniors, use their financial information to take over their accounts, which are then used to launder money and proceeds from other mass marketing fraud scams.</font></div><div class="plain"><br><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">Legitimate lottery companies will never demand payments before releasing winnings.</li><li class="plain">You must purchase a ticket to win the lottery.</li><li class="plain">Consumers cannot win foreign lotteries unless they have specifically attended that country and purchased a ticket.</li><li class="plain">Beware of counterfeit cheques or other forms of payment the fraudsters will send to help cover fees – such as tax payment, lawyers’ fees, customs, etc.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Emergency Scam</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><font style="" class="plainlarge">Scammers use social media, the internet and phones to target potential senior victims with the emergency scam. Seniors receive a call claiming to be a family member or a close friend describing an urgent situation that requires immediate funds. Common themes have been that the family member (e.g. grandchild) was arrested or got into an accident while travelling abroad. Monies are required for hospital expenses, lawyer fees or bail. Usually the potential victim is instructed to send money via a money service business like Western Union or MoneyGram or through prepaid cards, like Green Dot Money Pack, Pay Safe, or other types of gift cards.</font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs – How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">Confirm with other relatives the whereabouts of the family member or friend.</li><li class="plain">Police, judges or legal entities will never make urgent requests for money.</li><li class="plain">Never voluntarily give out family members’ names or information to unknown callers.</li><li class="plain">Always question urgent requests for money.</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="highlight">Romance Scams</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><font style="" class="plainlarge">Scammers steal photos and use dating sites and social media to lure potential victims into sending money for various reasons. The scammer will gain the trust of the victim through displays of affection and will communicate via phone, skype and email for months, if needed to build trust. The scammer will often claim to be working abroad, usually in a lucrative business venture. Eventually the scammer will want to meet with the victim in person. It is at this time that the scammer will inform them that they cannot afford to travel and will ask for money to cover travel costs. Another variation involves the scammer claiming that there is a medical emergency with a sick family member. They will then ask for money to cover medical expenses.</font></div><div class="plain"><br><font style="" class="highlight">Warning Signs ‐ How to Protect Yourself</font></div><div class="plain"><b><br></b><ul><li class="plain">Fraudsters want to develop a quick relationship. Be suspicious when someone you have not met professes their love for you.</li><li class="plain">Be wary when someone claims to be involved in a lucrative business but needs to borrow money for bills and expenses.</li><li class="plain">Be cautious when chatting with an individual who claims to live close but works overseas.</li><li class="plain">Do not cash cheques or send the person money for any reason, whatsoever!</li></ul><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainlarge">If you think you or someone you know has been a victim of fraud, please contact the Canadian Anti‐Fraud Centre at 1-888‐495‐8501 or report online at <a rel="" link="" target="_blank" href="http://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-eng.htm" class="plainlarge">http://www.antifraudcentre.ca</a><font style="" class="plain">.</font></font></div><div class="plain"><font style="" class="plainlarge"><br></font><font style="" class="plainsmall">This document is the property of the CAFC. It is loaned to your agency/department in confidence and it is not to be reclassified, copied, reproduced, used or further disseminated, in whole or part, without the consent of the originator. It is not to be used in affidavits, court proceedings or subpoenas or for any other legal or judicial purposes. This caveat is an integral part of this document and must accompany any information extracted from it.</font></div><p class="plain"></p> FCNB 2018-02-28T12:00:28-08:00 Financial Crime Trend Bulletin: Scams Targeting Seniors